PICNIC Festival to have in Rio de Janeiro its first complete edition outside Holland

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  • Posted on July 30, 2015


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    PICNIC, an international innovation in creative economy and digital culture festival which has been taking place for the past nine years in Amsterdam, announced that Rio de Janeiro will host the first complete edition outside Holland. The event, programmed for March 2016, was presented to representatives of creative industries, technology and entrepreneurs this Thursday, 30/07 at the Chamber of Commerce of Rio de Janeiro. The presentation, made with support from Rio Negócios, was attended by the subsecretary of Science and Technology of Rio de Janeiro state, Tande Vieira, as well as representatives from BNDES, PwC, Holland Brazil Chamber of Commerce and Sebrae.

    Themed Redesigning Growth, the event will explore how creative application of technology can assist tackling the challenges currently faced by society. The goal is to have a five-year program in Brazil and, in this first edition, connect 2.400 participants and impact over 3.000 people. “Redefining the paradigm of growth, focusing on sustainability, is part of the new generation’s collective consciousness, “said André Eppinghaus, one of the event’s organizers. “More than just an event, the objective is to create a network that goes beyond to generate dialogue between participants. This dialogue will seek to create a central agenda for governments to focus on the innovation sector”, he added.

    The arrival of PICNIC to Brazil is the fruit of a partnership between Eppinghaus and Daniela Brayner, from Nuvem Criativa, and will mark the end of celebrations for the 450th anniversary of Rio de Janeiro. The event will take place from 02 to 05/03, and will offer lectures, hacker labs, maker space, marketplace, art and culture, seeking new ways to integrate technology with creative industries. “PICNIC looks at technology as a medium to make innovation possible in audiovisual, design and creative cities”, said Eppinghaus.